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Dr Owolabi Bakre

Owolabi

Senior Lecturer in Accounting

Email: o.bakre@qmul.ac.uk
Telephone: +44 (0)20 7882 8784
Room Number: Room 3.35, Bancroft Building, Mile End Campus

Profile

Student drop-in and feedback hours
Wednesday 2:00 - 4:00pm

Research

Research Interests:

Dr Bakre's research is mainly qualitative, utilising sociological methodological perspectives. His work on accounting profession in developing countries, particularly Jamaica and globalisation, accounting and crimes in Nigeria has appeared in Advances in Public Interest Accounting, Critical Perspectives on Accounting, International Journal of Critical Accounting, Accounting Forum, Accountancy Business and the Public Interest and the European and the UK-based Tax Justice Network. He is on editorial boards of four international journals. He is also a member of panel of advisors on scholarship, Commonwealth Scholarship Commission, United Kingdom.

Publications

Refereed journal articles

  • Bakre, O M (2014), Imperialism and the integration of accountancy in the Commonwealth Caribbean, Forthcoming in Critical Perspectives on Accounting, Do1:10.1016/j.cpa.2013.08.008.
  • Bakre, O M (2011), Corporate Governance Practices as a Reflection of Socio-Political Environment in Nigeria, International Journal of Critical Accounting, Special Issue on African Accounting, Vol. 3, No 2/3, pp. 133-170.
  • Bakre, O M (2009), The Inappropriateness of Western Economic Power Frameworks of Accounting in Conducting Accounting Research in Emerging Economies: A Review of Evidence, Accountancy Business and the Public Interest, Vol. 8, No.2, 2009, pp. 65-95.
  • Bakre, O M (2008), Financial Reporting as Technology that Supports and Sustains Imperial Expansion and Control in the Colonial and Post Colonial Globalisation: the Case of the Jamaican Economy, Critical Perspectives on Accounting, Special Issue on Accounting for Global Warming, 2008, pp. 431-486.
  • Bakre, O M (2007), The Unethical and Sharp Practices of Accountants and Auditors and the Compromising Stance of Professional Bodies in Corporate World: Evidence from Corporate Nigeria, Accounting Forum, Vol. 31, 2007, pp. 277-303.
  • Bakre, O M (2007), Tax Evasion and Poverty in Nigeria, Alternative Sud, Vol. 14, Issue 1, 2007, pp. 151-171.
  • Bakre, O M (2006), Accounting Education, Training and the Profession in the Commonwealth Caribbean: Integration or Internationalisation? Accounting Forum, Vol. 30, 2006, pp. 285-313.
  • Bakre, O M (2006), Second Attempt at Localising Imperial Accountancy: The Case of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Jamaica (1970s – 1980s) Critical Perspectives on Accounting, Vol. 17, Issue 1, 2006, pp. 1- 28.
  • Bakre, O M (2005), First Attempt at Localising Imperial Accountancy: the Case of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Jamaica (1950s-1970s), Critical Perspectives on Accounting, Vol. 16, Issue 8, 2005, pp. 995-1018.
  • Bakre, O M (2004), Accounting and the Problematique of Imperialism: Alternative Methodological Approaches to Empirical Research in Accounting in Colonised Developing Countries Advances in Public Interest Accounting, Vol. 10, 2004, pp. 1-31.

Other Publication

  • Bakre, O M (2006), The Spoils of Oil: how multinationals and their professional advisers drain Nigeria of many resources, UK Tax Justice Focus, third quarter, Volume 2, number 2, 2006, pp. 4-5.

Book Chapter

  • Bakre, O M (2010), Imperialism and Professionalisation Project of Accountancy: The case of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Jamaica, in Poullaos and Suki (ed.) Accountancy and Empire: The Legacy of British Professional Organization, pp. 144-167.

Manuscripts under Review for Publication

  • Accounting without Accountability: cronyism and money laundering in Nigeria.
  • The Professionalisation of Accountancy in Nigeria: Exploring the Dilemma of Closure.
  • Accounting as a technology of neoliberalism: exploring the impact of the IFRSs-conditional neoliberal loans to Nigeria.
  • Privatisation and accountability in a ‘crony capitalist’ Nigerian state.

Manuscripts in Preparation

  • Unethical Practices of Accountants in the Political Directorate and Public Service in Nigeria.
  • Internationalisation of the Jamaican Accounting Standards: Colonialism and Globalisation Legacy of Inappropriate Technology.
  • Accountability and neoliberalism: exploring ‘accounting in action’ in the removal of subsidy on petroleum and kerosene products in Nigeria.
  • Privatisation and accountability in a ‘patron-clientelism’ Nigerian state.
  • Accounting and economic development: exploring the impact of tax avoidance on the Nigerian economy.

Refereed Conference Proceedings

  • Accounting without Accountability: cronyism and money laundering in Nigeria. Alternative Accounting Conference, Schulish Business School, York University, Canada, April 26-28, 2013.
  • The Professionalisation of Accountancy in Nigeria: Exploring the Dilemma of Closure. Accounting Section of the Critical Management Conference, Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, United Kingdom, July 16-17, 2013.
  • Privatisation and the Struggle for Control of Capital in Nigeria: Paper Presented at the Asian-Pacific Interdisciplinary Research in Accounting Conference (APIRA), Sydney, Australia, July 12-13, 2010.
  • Globalisation, Elite and Profession Connections in Money Laundering: Evidence from Nigeria. Paper Presented at the Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Accounting Conference, Innsbruck, Austral, July 8-11, 2009
  • Tax Avoidance and Poverty in Nigeria: Unmasking the Role of the Accountants. Paper Presented at the Tax Workshop, Tax Justice Network, Essex Business School, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester C04 3sq, UK, July 3-4, 2008.
  • Multinational agencies, Accountability, Poverty Alleviation and Development: Evidence from Nigeria, Paper Presented at the Critical Perspectives on Accounting Conference, Baruch College, CUNY, April 24 - 26, 2008 (with Shahzad Uddin).
  • Money Laundering and Poverty in Nigeria: Collaboration of Local and Foreign Capitalist Elites”, Paper Presented at the Critical Perspectives on Accounting Conference, Baruch College, CUNY, April 24 - 26, 2008.
  • Closure Policy amidst Construction of the Accountancy Market: The Institute of Chartered Accountants of Nigeria Monopoly Power of Accountancy faces Trials and Tribulations, Paper Presented at the 5TH Asia Pacific Interdisciplinary Research in Accounting Conference, Auckland, New Zealand July 8 – 10, 2007.
  • Tax Avoidance, Capital Flight and Poverty in Nigeria; the Unpatriotic Collaboration of the Elite, the Multinational Corporations and the Accountants: Some Evidence and Issues, Paper Presented at Tax Workshop, University of Essex, United Kingdom, July 2006.
  • Conflict of Identity amidst Integration of Accountancy: An Analysis of the Post Independence Development of the Accountancy Profession in the Commonwealth Caribbean, Critical Management Conference, Cambridge University, UK, July 4-6, 2005.
  • Internationalisation of the Jamaican Accounting Standards: Globalism Legacy of Inappropriate Technology, Critical Perspectives on Accounting Conference, Baruch College, CUNY, April 28 - May 2, 2005.
  • Second Attempt at Localising Imperial Accountancy: the Case of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Jamaica (ICAJ), (1970S - 1980S), 4TH Asia Pacific Interdisciplinary Research in Accounting Conference, Singapore, 3 – 6, July 2004.
  • Regional Integration Efforts and the Role of Imperial Accountancy: The Case of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of the Caribbean ICAC (1988 - 2002), Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Accounting Conference, Madrid, Spain, July 15 - 18, 2003. 
  • Counting Empires?: Historical Role and Functioning of  Accounting in the Commonwealth Caribbean Economies,  The 28th Annual Conference of the  Caribbean Studies Association (CSA) Belize, South America, May 26 - May 30, 2003.
  • Accounting Education, Practices and the Profession in the Commonwealth Caribbean: Regionalisation or Internationalisation? The 14th Asian-Pacific Conference on International Accounting Issues, Los Angeles, California, November 23 - 26, 2002.
  • Attempt by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Jamaica to Develop Local Accountancy Syllabus and Professional examinations 1965 – 2001, The 27th Annual Conference of the Caribbean Studies Association (CSA), Nassau, Bahamas, June 28 - July, 4, 2002.
  • Accounting and the Problematic of Imperialism: Alternative Methodological Approaches to Empirical Research in Accounting in Colonised Developing Countries, Critical Perspectives on Accounting Conference (CPA), Baruch College, City University of New York,   17, Lexington Avenue, New York 11011, April 25 - 28, 2002.
  •  First Attempt at Localising Imperial    Accountancy:  The Case of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Jamaica,   ICAJ 1950s - 1970s, Critical Perspectives on Accounting Conference  (CPA), Baruch College, City University of New York, 17, Lexington Avenue, New York 11011, April 25-28, 2002.
  • The Activities of the UK-based ACCA in the Commonwealth Caribbean: Economic Assistance or Economic imperialism?  The 26th Annual Conference of the Caribbean Studies Association (CSA), St.  Maarten – St. Martin, West Indies, 28 May – 1 June, 2001.

Non-Refereed Conference Proceedings

  • The Unethical Practices of Accountants and Auditors and the Compromising Stance of the Professional Bodies in the Corporate World: Evidence from Corporate Nigeria, Paper Presented at the Seminar, Department of Accounting, Finance and Management, University of Essex, Colchester, UK, November 29, 2006.
  • Western Institutions’ Neo-Liberal Privatisation meets Privatisation Drives of the New Post Military Nigerian Neo-Colonial Elites, Paper Presented at the Seminar, Centre for Global Accountability, Essex Business School, University of Essex, Colchester, UK, November 19, 2008.
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