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Dr Lily Jampol

Lily

Lecturer in Marketing

Email: l.jampol@qmul.ac.uk
Telephone: +44(0) 20 7882 6478
Room Number: Room 4.21a, Bancroft Building, Mile End Campus

Profile

Student drop-in and feedback hours

Research

Research Interests:

Lily Jampol’s research broadly concerns understanding the way in which factors outside our awareness impact our judgments and decisions and ultimately our well-being. Lily currently has two streams of research: One examining how covert, subtle biases in the way we communicate can affect equality in the workplace, and the other understanding how our well-being and happiness is affected by what we choose to buy. Lily uses quantitative methods to analyse behavioural data and collaborates with psychologists, economists, and business practitioners on interdisciplinary projects. In particular, Lily aims to impact social policy and organizational well-being.

Lily graduated with a PhD in Social Psychology from Cornell University and has a B.A. in Political Science from Mount Holyoke College in the United States. She has worked as a researcher at Harvard University, Princeton University, and University College London as well as at a behavioural economics think tank, Ideas 42. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the American Psychological Association’s Geis Memorial Award.

Media

NYmagazine - How to Buy Happiness

Time - The Best Last Minute Holiday Gifts Don't Need Wrapping

Newton International Fellowship Award - Press Release

Publications

  • Gilovich, T., Kumar, A. & Jampol, L. (January, 2015). A wonderful life: Experiential consumption and the pursuit of happiness. Journal of Consumer Psychology. Media coverage.
  • Gilovich, T., Kumar, A. & Jampol, L. (January, 2015). The beach, the bikini, and the best buy: Replies to Dunn and Weidman, and to Schmitt, Brakus, and Zarantonello. Journal of Consumer Psychology.
  • Jampol, L. & Zayas, V. (under review). The dark side of white lies? The subtle effect of biased performance feedback on inequality in the workplace.
  • Lupoli, M. J., Jampol, L., & Oveis, C. (2017). Lying Because We Care: Compassion Increases Prosocial Lying. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 1–18. http://doi.org/10.1037/xge0000315

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